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TD Ottawa Jazz Festival 2017: Single Day Ticket (Includes all concerts in Confederation Park & the Tartan Homes Stage) - Thu Jun 29 2017 at 5:30 pm
· Jun · 29 Thu at TekSavvy Main Stage Confederation Park Laurier Ave & Elgin Street Ottawa, ON K1P 5J2
Park Gates at 5:30 pm
Tickets: $52.00 Incl HST & Fees Ticket prices increase by $3 day of show.

General Admission / All Ages Welcome / No Refunds or Exchanges / Rain or Shine

Item Price
NO LONGER AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE ONLINE
The Legendary Downchild Blues Band The Legendary Downchild Blues Band
The Legendary Downchild Blues Band Along with Ronnie Hawkins, Donnie Walsh—Downchild Blues Band co-founder—has mentored and led more musicians than any dozen other Canadian bandleaders. By Walsh’s reckoning, some 120 musicians have passed through the band’s ranks since he and his younger brother Richard formed Downchild in 1969. Among those they influenced was harmonica aficionado Dan Aykroyd, who modelled fictional Blues Brothers Jake and Elwood Blues on the Walsh siblings. While the band takes its name from a Sonny Boy Williamson song, the style of its best-known songs is predominantly influenced by the jump blues of artists like Louis Jordan, Charles Brown and T-Bone Walker. In its prime—roughly 1973-82—Downchild had several hit recordings, managing to break out of the blues genre into the mainstream of Canadian rock. Despite losing several key members, including Richard Walsh, his replacement Tony Flaim and pianist Jane Vasey, Downchild has continued to be a stalwart of the Canadian concert scene, and the popularity of the Blues Brothers films have elevated Donnie Walsh and his band to legendary status among blues fans.
Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters
Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters Guitarist Ronnie Earl has spent 40 years chasing the blues into the future. Though Ronald Horvath wasn't born under a bad sign, when he turned 20 he gravitated decisively in the direction of Muddy Waters (for whom he changed his name to “Earl,” the better to be remembered), Otis Rush, Big Walter Horton, Koko Taylor and Sunnyland Slim, mentors from the Chicago blues pantheon. By 1979 Earl was star soloist of the Roomful of Blues, a jump-and-swing tentet touring out of New England. But after nine years Earl grew dissatisfied, so he left to establish his own smaller, hardcore ensemble, the Broadcasters. Twenty years on they still roar, as a quartet. Earl’s blues means to be contemporary, stretching the essence into soulful, smooth and progressive territory, influenced by Wes Montgomery or Thelonious Monk. Twenty-three albums in his name, multiple Blues Music Awards, teaching credits from Berklee College of Music, and Ronnie Earl still has that itch to play.
Rory Block Rory Block
Rory Block The blues has, from its inception more than 100 years ago in the tent shows of Ma Rainey, resonated with women. In fact Rainey, the Mother of the Blues, identified the music as a woman's “strange and poignant” song about her man being gone. From Rainey to Bessie Smith to Billie Holiday to Janis Joplin and down through Beyoncé today, many women have given voice to the blues, though far fewer have focused on instrumental expression. Guitarist Rory Block is a wonderful exception. She fuses voice and guitar inseparably in performance, as did her heroes, Mississippi Delta masters such as Robert Johnson, Bukka White, Fred McDowell and Son House. Block grew up in 1960s Greenwich Village, not in rural cottonfields, yet her intensity channels the deep feelings people might suffer whatever their background, however they live. She is a preservationist who makes the fire of acoustic blues burn white hot, as she lights it.
Kandace Springs Kandace Springs
Kandace Springs Nashville native Kandace Springs may only be touring behind her Blue Note Records debut album, but she’s already a music veteran with a personal endorsement from the late Prince of Paisley Park. The Prince connection makes a great conversation starter, but Springs made it to where she is in a very traditional way: studying piano from the age of 10, following her father’s encouragement to develop a distinctive singing voice and winning her Blue Note contract by auditioning in person for label head Don Was. Soul Eyes found her echoing forebears like Nina Simone, Roberta Flack and Norah Jones, but sounding exactly like no one but herself. It didn’t hurt that she had jazz veterans like Terence Blanchard and Vinnie Colaiuta onboard, and producer Larry Klein at the helm. Having already appeared on major television and festival stages—to say nothing of being Prince’s guest at his Purple Rain 30th anniversary party—Springs is on a mission to show audiences around the world what those music business heavyweights discovered.

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